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In an omnibus poll conducted for Capers Community
Markets between May 30 and June 11, 2007, the Mustel Group surveyed a
random sample of 500 Greater Vancouver adults, 18 years of age and over.

webfarmer_10804In an omnibus poll conducted for Capers Community Markets between May 30 and June 11, 2007, the Mustel Group surveyed a random sample of 500 Greater Vancouver adults, 18 years of age and over. The study compared attitudes, awareness and stated shopping habits regarding preference for locally grown produce against a similar Mustel Group omnibus poll, also conducted for Capers, between June 7 and June 15, 2005.

Results are subject to a margin of error of +/-4.5 per cent at the 95th confidence level.

General preference
1. As found in 2005, the majority of shoppers (seven in 10) prefer locally grown produce (defined as grown within British Columbia). Consumers 35 years of age or over are more inclined to prefer locally grown produce (72 per cent in the 2007 measure) than the younger shoppers (56 per cent).

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Purchasing decisions
2. Seven in ten B.C. adults report having increased the amount of B.C.-grown produce they buy over the past two years. Reasons for the stated increase include, in this order: supporting local farmers and the local economy, wider selection, environmental benefits (less pollution from transporting), freshness of produce, and health benefits (fewer pesticides).

To view the figures accompanying this release please click on the following link: www.ccnmatthews.com/docs/ccm0626.pdf

3. As found in 2005, nine in ten B.C. adults say they prefer B.C.-grown produce(1) and buy B.C.-grown produce whenever it is available and always look for produce that is in season locally.

4. Two-thirds (up from half in 2005) are willing to pay extra for B.C. produce.

Perceived benefits
5. The top two reasons people cite for eating B.C.-grown produce are still to support the local economy and local farmers (69 per cent of consumers), and because it is fresher, not picked “green” and spends less time in transit (30 per cent of consumers). However, 2007 saw a significant increase in the proportion of adults citing reduction in transportation distance as a benefit (up to 17 per cent from 3 per cent in 2005).

Ipact of Information on Produce Purchase Decisions
6. As found in 2005, knowing that buying locally grown produce helps support family-run farms and rural communities in B.C. had the most impact on produce purchase decisions, with 90 per cent of respondents indicating this knowledge would make them more inclined to purchase locally grown produce. The second most influential factor was that locally grown produce is more flavourful, with 72 per cent of respondents saying this would make them more likely to buy local produce.

7. 2007 saw a significant jump in environmental awareness with 84 per cent of respondents (compared with 72 per cent in 2005) who indicated they would be more likely to buy locally grown produce when they learned that locally grown produce is better for the environment because it reduces air pollution from trucking and reduces fuel consumption. This factor ranked significantly higher than flavour in 2007 in influencing intention to buy locally grown produce.

8. A higher proportion of consumers than in 2005 reported that information regarding pesticides (76 per cent in 2007 versus 63 per cent in 2005) and preference for B.C.-grown produce among leading chefs as influencing their decision to purchase B.C.-grown produce (53 per cent in 2007 compared with 42 per cent in 2005). Furthermore, the vast majority state that health benefits (higher vitamin content) is a factor.

(1) In 2007, the term “B.C.-grown” was used in place of the term “locally grown.” •