Canadian Pizza Magazine

Features In the Kitchen Tools of the Trade
Grilling season is here

Getting the gas grill out for another season


March 4, 2008
By Canadian Pizza

Topics

Cleaning the gas grill is probably not the most
enjoyable activity barbecue owners face each spring season, but it’s a
task that must be done.

Cleaning the gas grill is probably not the most enjoyable activity barbecue owners face each spring season, but it’s a task that must be done.

“When I am invited to a barbecue and look at the grills, they are often full of black carbon buildup,” says Naz Cavallaro, a sales manager for Ontario-based barbecue maker Onward Manufacturing.

“And what is really unappetizing are the black carbon flakes on the lid, falling into food on the grill.”

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He adds that one of the problems is that the flavour bars or ceramic briquettes are full of black burned grease.

“It is very important to turn them over and wash them in warm soapy water and (use) a scouring pad, although it isn’t necessary to do this every time you grill,” he advises.

“But if you see a buildup of grease occurring it is important to get it off.”

Cavallaro says washing the barbecue parts in the dishwasher “is a no-no.”

One way to maintain a clean barbecue is to burn off residue by turning the grill on high until the smoke stops. “Then brush the cooking grates with a brass grill brush and this should be enough to turn any accumulated debris to ashes,” he says.

He says the pan liner of the barbecue should be changed when necessary. “You can buy these drip pans from barbecue dealers. They are made to fit the catch pan under the bottom tray of your gas grill.”

Regularly changing the liner also discourages animals from visiting your grill for a snack at midnight. Cavallaro suggests that a soapy fine steel-wool pad, used carefully, can remove smoke stains from the grill lid.

For safety reasons, he says it is very important to check all gas fittings and hoses for leaks when the grilling season starts.

Cavallaro also suggests storing cleaning supplies – brass wire and stainless-steel wire brushes, soap-embedded fine steel-wool pads, mild dish soap; sponge or dish cloth; plastic or Teflon scraper; a putty knife; fitted foil pan liners – close by in a toolbox as a way to keep on top of caring for the barbecue.•�

 Pizza Dough for Grilled Pizza
This recipe comes from Pizza, the book by World Pizza Champion Tony Gemignani and Diane Morgan. This dough is easy to work with, the texture and crispness of the crust is fabulous, and the subtle flavour that comes from the addition of rye flour makes the crust distinct and delicious. Substitute whole-wheat flour if desired.

INGREDIENTS

2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast
3/4 cup lukewarm water (90 to 100 F)
1 tbsp lukewarm water
1/4 cup rye flour
2 tbsp olive oil (plus extra for oiling bowl)
3/4 tsp salt
1 3/4 cups flour, plus extra for dusting
Makes 16 ounces of dough.

1. To make dough by hand: begin by making a sponge. In a medium bowl, dissolve the yeast in 1/4 cup of the warm water. Add the rye flour and stir with a wooden spoon or rubber spatula to combine. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place for 20 to 30 minutes. Add the remaining 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon of warm water, the 2 tablespoons olive oil, salt, and 1 3/4 cups flour to the sponge. Using a wooden spoon, mix the dough, incorporating as much of the flour as possible. Turn the dough out on a lightly floured surface and knead until soft and elastic, 10 to 12 minutes. It will still be a little sticky but shouldn’t stick to your hands. Add only a minimum amount of flour to the work surface to keep the dough from sticking. Generously oil a large bowl. Add the dough and turn to coat on all sides. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and then place a clean, damp kitchen towel over the top.

To make the dough using a mixer: fit a heavy-duty stand mixer with the dough hook attachment. In the mixer bowl, stir the yeast into 1/4 cup of the warm water. Add the rye flour and mix on low speed until combined. Place a clean, damp kitchen towel over the mixer to cover the bowl and let the sponge rise for 20 minutes. Add the remaining 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon warm water, the 2 tablespoons olive oil, salt, and 1 3/4 cups flour to the sponge. Mix on low speed until the flour is incorporated and the dough gathers together to form a coarse ball, about three minutes. Let rest for two minutes and then mix on medium-low speed until the dough is smooth and slightly sticky, about three minutes longer. Even if the dough seems too sticky, turn out the dough on a well-floured work surface and knead it for a minute or two until it forms a smooth ball, adding up to 2 tablespoons of additional flour, if necessary. Generously oil a large bowl. Add the dough and turn to coat on all sides. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and then place a clean, damp kitchen towel over the top.

2. Set the bowl in a warm spot (a pilot-light heated oven is a good spot, or an electric oven turned to 150 F for five minutes and then turned off). Let the dough rise until doubled in volume, about two hours. Punch down the dough, cover it, and let rise for another 40 minutes. The dough is now ready to be rolled out.


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